The trends of this century regarding the recognition of Indigenous peoples’ rights are being shaped by the 2007 Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Before this important declaration, Indigenous peoples worldwide were neglected in the international adoption of the human rights standards (with the exception of the International Labour Organization). This neglect was entrenched to international developments, including the Cold War and the modern drive towards economic development and exploitation of Indigenous People, their lands and resources. this is because settler States, colonial and neo-colonial practices, and extractivism have never been (and sometimes still are not!) at peace with Indigenous peoples. For example, Canada promotes itself as a nation of peacemakers concerned with justice. However, in its dealing with Indigenous peoples the reality does not reflect the rhetoric. As an instance, Canada opposed UNDRIP. When it finally signed in 2010 the government held that the document’s goals and recognitions are “aspirational” (and not legally binding). For peacebuilding to be real and meaningful, Canadian governments must transform rhetoric into reality and vigorously protect (rather than resist) Indigenous rights through law. Reconciliation with Indigenous peoples for the colonization and historical wrongdoing is then due to achieve internal peace, respect of human rights and territorial recognition. An example of reconciliation and Indigenous peoples’ peace tradition comes from New Zealand (Moriori of Rēkohu - Chatham Islands; Waitaha in the South Island; and Parihaka in the North Island). Additionally, in Bolivia, there have been political upheavals which included the response of the Indigenous people to political change from the 1950s agrarian reforms. Indigenous peoples requested the fundamental citizen participation, redistribution of the land, reforming the control of the State over the natural resources and the economy, universal suffrage and agrarian reform. although their requests were not originally met, Bolivia underwent a process of deep political transformation, until it become the Plurinational State of Bolivia with the president Evo Morales, the country’s first president to come from an Indigenous people. These are just few examples on how settler States have undergone a process of peacebuilding and reconciliation with its Indigenous peoples. This presentation will argue that such reconciliation and peacebuilding process have a positive impact on the environment, intended as conservation of biodiversity, protection of forests and even promotion of Rights of Nature. In fact, when territorial and land rights of Indigenous peoples are recognized and protected, this has a positive impact with the environment and natural resources, resulting in thriving biodiversity. This is because Indigenous peoples share an intimate, holistic relationship with Sacred Nature, and this relationship has long (and it is still in some cases!) neglected by settler States.

Indigenous peacebulding processes and the environment

Giada Giacomini
In corso di stampa

Abstract

The trends of this century regarding the recognition of Indigenous peoples’ rights are being shaped by the 2007 Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Before this important declaration, Indigenous peoples worldwide were neglected in the international adoption of the human rights standards (with the exception of the International Labour Organization). This neglect was entrenched to international developments, including the Cold War and the modern drive towards economic development and exploitation of Indigenous People, their lands and resources. this is because settler States, colonial and neo-colonial practices, and extractivism have never been (and sometimes still are not!) at peace with Indigenous peoples. For example, Canada promotes itself as a nation of peacemakers concerned with justice. However, in its dealing with Indigenous peoples the reality does not reflect the rhetoric. As an instance, Canada opposed UNDRIP. When it finally signed in 2010 the government held that the document’s goals and recognitions are “aspirational” (and not legally binding). For peacebuilding to be real and meaningful, Canadian governments must transform rhetoric into reality and vigorously protect (rather than resist) Indigenous rights through law. Reconciliation with Indigenous peoples for the colonization and historical wrongdoing is then due to achieve internal peace, respect of human rights and territorial recognition. An example of reconciliation and Indigenous peoples’ peace tradition comes from New Zealand (Moriori of Rēkohu - Chatham Islands; Waitaha in the South Island; and Parihaka in the North Island). Additionally, in Bolivia, there have been political upheavals which included the response of the Indigenous people to political change from the 1950s agrarian reforms. Indigenous peoples requested the fundamental citizen participation, redistribution of the land, reforming the control of the State over the natural resources and the economy, universal suffrage and agrarian reform. although their requests were not originally met, Bolivia underwent a process of deep political transformation, until it become the Plurinational State of Bolivia with the president Evo Morales, the country’s first president to come from an Indigenous people. These are just few examples on how settler States have undergone a process of peacebuilding and reconciliation with its Indigenous peoples. This presentation will argue that such reconciliation and peacebuilding process have a positive impact on the environment, intended as conservation of biodiversity, protection of forests and even promotion of Rights of Nature. In fact, when territorial and land rights of Indigenous peoples are recognized and protected, this has a positive impact with the environment and natural resources, resulting in thriving biodiversity. This is because Indigenous peoples share an intimate, holistic relationship with Sacred Nature, and this relationship has long (and it is still in some cases!) neglected by settler States.
Ecological integrity, peace and public health
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10278/3763854
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