This study investigates for the first time the contamination of water and sediment of the Venice Lagoon by twenty Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs): three hormones, six pharmaceutical compounds (diclofenac and five antibiotics, three of which are macrolides), nine pesticides (methiocarb, oxadiazon, metaflumizone, triallate, and five neonicotinoids), one antioxidant (BHT), and one UV filter (EHMC). Water and sediment samples were collected in seven sites in four seasons, with the aim of investigating the occurrence, distribution, and possible emission sources of the selected CECs in the studied transitional environment. The most frequently detected contaminants in water were neonicotinoid insecticides (with a frequency of quantification of single contaminants ranging from 73% to 92%), and EHMC (detected in the 77% of samples), followed by BHT (42%), diclofenac (39%), and clarithromycin (35%). In sediment the highest quantification frequencies were those of BHT (54%), estrogens (ranging from 35% to 65%), and azithromycin (46%). Although this baseline study does not highlight seasonal or spatial trends, results suggested that two of the major emission sources of CECs in the Venice Lagoon could be tributary rivers from its drainage basin and treated wastewater, due to the limited removal rates of some CECs in WWTPs. These preliminary results call for further investigations to better map priority emission sources and improve the understanding of CECs environmental behavior, with the final aim of drawing up a site-specific Watch List of CECs for the Venice Lagoon and support the design of more comprehensive monitoring plans in the future.

Contaminants of emerging concern in water and sediment of the Venice Lagoon, Italy

Pizzini, Sarah;Giubilato, Elisa;Morabito, Elisa;Barbaro, Elena;Bonetto, Alessandro;Calgaro, Loris;Feltracco, Matteo;Semenzin, Elena;Vecchiato, Marco;Zangrando, Roberta;Gambaro, Andrea;Marcomini, Antonio
2024-01-01

Abstract

This study investigates for the first time the contamination of water and sediment of the Venice Lagoon by twenty Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs): three hormones, six pharmaceutical compounds (diclofenac and five antibiotics, three of which are macrolides), nine pesticides (methiocarb, oxadiazon, metaflumizone, triallate, and five neonicotinoids), one antioxidant (BHT), and one UV filter (EHMC). Water and sediment samples were collected in seven sites in four seasons, with the aim of investigating the occurrence, distribution, and possible emission sources of the selected CECs in the studied transitional environment. The most frequently detected contaminants in water were neonicotinoid insecticides (with a frequency of quantification of single contaminants ranging from 73% to 92%), and EHMC (detected in the 77% of samples), followed by BHT (42%), diclofenac (39%), and clarithromycin (35%). In sediment the highest quantification frequencies were those of BHT (54%), estrogens (ranging from 35% to 65%), and azithromycin (46%). Although this baseline study does not highlight seasonal or spatial trends, results suggested that two of the major emission sources of CECs in the Venice Lagoon could be tributary rivers from its drainage basin and treated wastewater, due to the limited removal rates of some CECs in WWTPs. These preliminary results call for further investigations to better map priority emission sources and improve the understanding of CECs environmental behavior, with the final aim of drawing up a site-specific Watch List of CECs for the Venice Lagoon and support the design of more comprehensive monitoring plans in the future.
2024
249
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10278/5049560
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