The fish industry produces every year huge amounts of waste that represent an underutilized source of chemical richness. In this contribution, type I collagen was extracted from the scales of Mugil cephalus and carbon dots (CDs) were synthesized from the scales of Dicentrarchus labrax. These materials were combined to make hybrid films with UV-blocking ability, by casting a mixture of gelatin, glycerol (15%), and CDs (0, 1, 3, and 5%). The films were fully characterized from the mechanical, morphological, and optical point of view. Here, 40 mu m thick films were obtained, characterized by a high water solubility (70%); moreover, the presence of CDs improved the film mechanical properties, in particular increasing the tensile strength (TS) up to 17 MPa and elongation at break (EAB) up to 40%. The CDs also modulated water vapor permeability and the thermal stability of the films. From the optical point of view, with just 5% loading of CDs the films blocked almost 70% of the UV radiation with negligible change in transparency (88.6% for the nonloaded vs 84.4% for 5% CDs) and opacity (1.32 for nonloaded vs 1.61 for 5% CDs). These types of hybrid biobased films hold promise for the production of sustainable UV-shields both for human health and for prolonging the shelf life of food.

Fish-Waste-Derived Gelatin and Carbon Dots for Biobased UV-Blocking Films

Campalani, Carlotta;Selva, Maurizio
;
Perosa, Alvise
2022-01-01

Abstract

The fish industry produces every year huge amounts of waste that represent an underutilized source of chemical richness. In this contribution, type I collagen was extracted from the scales of Mugil cephalus and carbon dots (CDs) were synthesized from the scales of Dicentrarchus labrax. These materials were combined to make hybrid films with UV-blocking ability, by casting a mixture of gelatin, glycerol (15%), and CDs (0, 1, 3, and 5%). The films were fully characterized from the mechanical, morphological, and optical point of view. Here, 40 mu m thick films were obtained, characterized by a high water solubility (70%); moreover, the presence of CDs improved the film mechanical properties, in particular increasing the tensile strength (TS) up to 17 MPa and elongation at break (EAB) up to 40%. The CDs also modulated water vapor permeability and the thermal stability of the films. From the optical point of view, with just 5% loading of CDs the films blocked almost 70% of the UV radiation with negligible change in transparency (88.6% for the nonloaded vs 84.4% for 5% CDs) and opacity (1.32 for nonloaded vs 1.61 for 5% CDs). These types of hybrid biobased films hold promise for the production of sustainable UV-shields both for human health and for prolonging the shelf life of food.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10278/5011966
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