Theory: the stratification of forced migrants’ welfare rights in pandemic times Context: Italy’s asylum governance on day one of COVID-19 Research design, data, and case selection Empirical results Discussion and conclusion: possibilities of forced migrants’ emancipation in post-pandemic host societies Acknowledgements Disclosure statement Additional information Footnotes References Appendixes Full Article Figures & data References Citations Metrics Licensing Reprints & Permissions View PDFView EPUB ABSTRACT This article analyzes how forced migrants have been pushed further down in the hierarchy of social citizenship amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing on evidence from research in six cities of north-eastern Italy, we show that their welfare rights have stratified due to national immigration policies that imply unequal access to social protection. Local-level forces – including regional welfare institutions, municipal governments, and civil society organizations – have either magnified or mitigated such state-driven stratification. This process resulted in uneven landscapes of social citizenship, with a minority of migrants relatively well-protected and the others entangled into downward, pandemic-induced spirals of marginalization. In this way various forms of exclusion were activated, and accumulated on, one another – what we define as COVID-19’s ‘ripple effect’. These findings travel beyond Italy as an exemplary case of rampant nativism and urge post-pandemic host societies to emancipate welfare rights from the immigration policies to which they are so often subordinated.

Further to the bottom of the hierarchy: the stratification of forced migrants' welfare rights amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy

Bazurli, R
;
Campomori, F
2022-01-01

Abstract

Theory: the stratification of forced migrants’ welfare rights in pandemic times Context: Italy’s asylum governance on day one of COVID-19 Research design, data, and case selection Empirical results Discussion and conclusion: possibilities of forced migrants’ emancipation in post-pandemic host societies Acknowledgements Disclosure statement Additional information Footnotes References Appendixes Full Article Figures & data References Citations Metrics Licensing Reprints & Permissions View PDFView EPUB ABSTRACT This article analyzes how forced migrants have been pushed further down in the hierarchy of social citizenship amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing on evidence from research in six cities of north-eastern Italy, we show that their welfare rights have stratified due to national immigration policies that imply unequal access to social protection. Local-level forces – including regional welfare institutions, municipal governments, and civil society organizations – have either magnified or mitigated such state-driven stratification. This process resulted in uneven landscapes of social citizenship, with a minority of migrants relatively well-protected and the others entangled into downward, pandemic-induced spirals of marginalization. In this way various forms of exclusion were activated, and accumulated on, one another – what we define as COVID-19’s ‘ripple effect’. These findings travel beyond Italy as an exemplary case of rampant nativism and urge post-pandemic host societies to emancipate welfare rights from the immigration policies to which they are so often subordinated.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2022_Further to the bottom of the hierarchy the stratification of forced migrants welfare rights amid the COVID 19 pandemic in Italy.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Accesso libero (no vincoli)
Dimensione 1.23 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.23 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in ARCA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10278/5010000
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact