Mental health is impacted by social, economic, and environmental factors, the Social Determinants of Health (SDH). Migrants experiencing precarious living and working conditions may be more at risk of poor mental health than the majority population. This paper aims to evaluate the relationship of educational attainment and other SDH with depressive symptoms among the resident population, including Italians and migrants. This study examined the respondents to the Italian “Progressi delle Aziende Sanitarie per la Salute in Italia” (PASSI) surveillance system, 2014–18. The sample of 144.055 respondents is composed of the resident working adults aged 25–69 with Italian citizenship (n = 136.514) and foreign citizenship (n = 7.491). Findings show that among Italians high level of education appears to be a protective factor for mental health, in accordance with the international evidence (adjPR: tertiary education 0,74 p-value = 0.000). However, among immigrants high level of education is associated with the presence of depressive symptoms (adjPR: tertiary education: 1.61 p-value = 0.006), particularly for men (adjPR: tertiary education: 2.40 p-value = 0.006). The longer the length of stay in Italy for immigrants the higher the risk of depressive symptoms: adjPR for 10+ years: 2.23 p-value = 0.005. The data show that high education could represent a risk factor for mental health of immigrants. Moreover, among migrants there are some significant mental health inequities between male and female related to the duration of stay in Italy, economic activity and educational level. Considering that health is related to the nature of society as well as to access to technical solutions, multicultural societies require culturally oriented interventions for tackling health inequities. This means developing evidence-based policies in order to tackle health inequalities in the population as a whole, including culturally oriented measures in the larger framework of developing diversity sensitive services.

Social determinants of mental health in Italy: the role of education in the comparison of migrant and Italian residents

Campostrini, Stefano;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Mental health is impacted by social, economic, and environmental factors, the Social Determinants of Health (SDH). Migrants experiencing precarious living and working conditions may be more at risk of poor mental health than the majority population. This paper aims to evaluate the relationship of educational attainment and other SDH with depressive symptoms among the resident population, including Italians and migrants. This study examined the respondents to the Italian “Progressi delle Aziende Sanitarie per la Salute in Italia” (PASSI) surveillance system, 2014–18. The sample of 144.055 respondents is composed of the resident working adults aged 25–69 with Italian citizenship (n = 136.514) and foreign citizenship (n = 7.491). Findings show that among Italians high level of education appears to be a protective factor for mental health, in accordance with the international evidence (adjPR: tertiary education 0,74 p-value = 0.000). However, among immigrants high level of education is associated with the presence of depressive symptoms (adjPR: tertiary education: 1.61 p-value = 0.006), particularly for men (adjPR: tertiary education: 2.40 p-value = 0.006). The longer the length of stay in Italy for immigrants the higher the risk of depressive symptoms: adjPR for 10+ years: 2.23 p-value = 0.005. The data show that high education could represent a risk factor for mental health of immigrants. Moreover, among migrants there are some significant mental health inequities between male and female related to the duration of stay in Italy, economic activity and educational level. Considering that health is related to the nature of society as well as to access to technical solutions, multicultural societies require culturally oriented interventions for tackling health inequities. This means developing evidence-based policies in order to tackle health inequalities in the population as a whole, including culturally oriented measures in the larger framework of developing diversity sensitive services.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10278/5002032
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