Continuous 1-minute indoor and outdoor PM concentrations (~PM2.5) were measured from November through April of 2015/16 and 2016/17 at 50 single family residences in Monroe County, NY (25 per season) using Speck (Airviz Inc., Pittsburgh, PA) low-cost monitors (LCMs). While the accuracy of LCMs is inconsistent and source dependent, the LCMs provided reasonable precision for estimating indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios based on laboratory and field testing, understanding the relationship between indoor sources and concentration, and comparing PM concentrations across residences for the detected size range (0.5-3 mm). The indoor PM2.5 concentration pattern showed clear morning and evening peaks as well as higher indoor concentrations during the weekends when people are typically at home. The mean I/O PM2.5 ratio was 1.1 for all homes and increased to 1.7 when a combustion source was in use as indicated by an elevated CO concentration whereas most prior studies have found this ratio to be < 1. Increases in wood-burning appliance temperature and indoor CO concentrations were found to be associated with an overall moderate (mean value of 2.1 µg/m3) increase in indoor PM concentration averaged over the heating season. Short-term PM increases greater than 100 µg/m3 were periodically observed in homes with and without wood-burning appliances operating. This study provides an approach for exposure assessment in homes that can be utilized by employing appropriate calibration and quality assurance procedures for the LCMs.

Residential Indoor and Outdoor PM Measured Using Low-cost Monitors during the Heating Season in Monroe County, NY

MASIOL M.;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

Continuous 1-minute indoor and outdoor PM concentrations (~PM2.5) were measured from November through April of 2015/16 and 2016/17 at 50 single family residences in Monroe County, NY (25 per season) using Speck (Airviz Inc., Pittsburgh, PA) low-cost monitors (LCMs). While the accuracy of LCMs is inconsistent and source dependent, the LCMs provided reasonable precision for estimating indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios based on laboratory and field testing, understanding the relationship between indoor sources and concentration, and comparing PM concentrations across residences for the detected size range (0.5-3 mm). The indoor PM2.5 concentration pattern showed clear morning and evening peaks as well as higher indoor concentrations during the weekends when people are typically at home. The mean I/O PM2.5 ratio was 1.1 for all homes and increased to 1.7 when a combustion source was in use as indicated by an elevated CO concentration whereas most prior studies have found this ratio to be < 1. Increases in wood-burning appliance temperature and indoor CO concentrations were found to be associated with an overall moderate (mean value of 2.1 µg/m3) increase in indoor PM concentration averaged over the heating season. Short-term PM increases greater than 100 µg/m3 were periodically observed in homes with and without wood-burning appliances operating. This study provides an approach for exposure assessment in homes that can be utilized by employing appropriate calibration and quality assurance procedures for the LCMs.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in ARCA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10278/5000293
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact