For centuries silver and silver compounds have been in use to control infection and avoid septicaemia in the care of burns and chronic wounds. Renewed interest has resulted in a number of Ag based dressings that are now widely used in burns centres. Despite extensive use, a systematic study of the chemical composition, release kinetics and biochemical action of these products has yet to be published. In this work we have characterized the morphology of four commercial Ag dressings by scanning electron microscopy and the silver content was determined to range between 1.39 mg/cm2 and 0.03 mg/cm2. Release kinetics in three different matrices (ultra pure water, normal saline solution and a human serum substitute) were determined. The highest rates were found in serum substitute, with a maximum of 4099 mg/ (h cm2) to a minimum of 0.0001 mg/(h cm2). Our results show that the mean inhibitory concentrations are exceeded for most common pathogens in serum substitute and sterile water, but the presence of high Cl concentrations tend to inactivate the dressings.

For centuries silver and silver compounds have been in use to control infection and avoid septicaemia in the care of burns and chronic wounds. Renewed interest has resulted in a number of Ag based dressings that are now widely used in burns centres. Despite extensive use, a systematic study of the chemical composition, release kinetics and biochemical action of these products has yet to be published. In this work we have characterized the morphology of four commercial Ag dressings by scanning electron microscopy and the silver content was determined to range between 1.39 mg/cm2 and 0.03 mg/cm 2. Release kinetics in three different matrices (ultra pure water, normal saline solution and a human serum substitute) were determined. The highest rates were found in serum substitute, with a maximum of 4099 μg/(h cm2) to a minimum of 0.0001 μg/(h cm2). Our results show that the mean inhibitory concentrations are exceeded for most common pathogens in serum substitute and sterile water, but the presence of high Cl- concentrations tend to inactivate the dressings. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

Characterization and evaluation of silver release from four different dressings used in burns care

RIGO, CHIARA;ROMAN, Marco;BARBANTE, Carlo;Warren R. L. Cairns
2012

Abstract

For centuries silver and silver compounds have been in use to control infection and avoid septicaemia in the care of burns and chronic wounds. Renewed interest has resulted in a number of Ag based dressings that are now widely used in burns centres. Despite extensive use, a systematic study of the chemical composition, release kinetics and biochemical action of these products has yet to be published. In this work we have characterized the morphology of four commercial Ag dressings by scanning electron microscopy and the silver content was determined to range between 1.39 mg/cm2 and 0.03 mg/cm2. Release kinetics in three different matrices (ultra pure water, normal saline solution and a human serum substitute) were determined. The highest rates were found in serum substitute, with a maximum of 4099 mg/ (h cm2) to a minimum of 0.0001 mg/(h cm2). Our results show that the mean inhibitory concentrations are exceeded for most common pathogens in serum substitute and sterile water, but the presence of high Cl concentrations tend to inactivate the dressings.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2012_Rigo et al. BURNS.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Accesso chiuso-personale
Dimensione 1.48 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.48 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in ARCA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10278/39325
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 58
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 55
social impact