Although biogas production can have some benefits, there is a research gap on potential influence of biogas plant emissions on local air quality, thus an accurate and comprehensive evaluation of impacts of this technology is needed. This study deals with this issue by means of a characterisation of air pollution near an industrial area including a biogas production (from biomass) and combustion plant located in South Italy. The methodology consists in advanced statistical analysis on concentration of gaseous pollutants, particles concentration and size distribution in number and mass, and PM2.5 chemical composition. High-temporal resolution measurements, supported by ancillary meteorological parameters, and source apportionment of PM2.5 using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model, are performed. The integrated approach provides the emissive picture consisting in different anthropogenic sources (i.e. traffic, biomass burning, and industrial facilities) with particular focus on biogas plant emissions. Results showed that CO and nitrogen oxides were influenced by vehicular traffic and biomass combustion, however, a contribution of the plant to NO was observed. SO2 was influenced mainly by transport from the industrial zone, but a second local contribution compatible with the emissions of the biogas plant was detected. Number particle concentrations were analysed in four size ranges: nanoparticles (D < 0.05 μm), ultrafine particles (D < 0.3 μm), accumulation (0.3 < D < 1 μm) and coarse particles (D > 1 μm). Nanoparticles and ultrafine particles were mainly influenced by vehicular traffic and biomass burning, instead, a contribution of the plant was individuated in the accumulation mode. PMF5 identified the contribution of six sources: crustal (14.7% ± 2.1% of measured PM2.5); marine aerosol (aged) (12.9% ± 2.3%); biomass burning (32.8% ± 1.4%); secondary sulphate (19.7% ± 2.4%); primary industrial emissions (5.4% ± 2.3%); traffic and secondary nitrate (17.0% ± 3.9%). The plant is likely to contribute to both sources, the industrial and the traffic plus secondary nitrate.

Characterisation of atmospheric pollution near an industrial site with a biogas production and combustion plant in southern Italy

Merico E.;Grasso F. M.;Gambaro A.;Morabito E.;
2020

Abstract

Although biogas production can have some benefits, there is a research gap on potential influence of biogas plant emissions on local air quality, thus an accurate and comprehensive evaluation of impacts of this technology is needed. This study deals with this issue by means of a characterisation of air pollution near an industrial area including a biogas production (from biomass) and combustion plant located in South Italy. The methodology consists in advanced statistical analysis on concentration of gaseous pollutants, particles concentration and size distribution in number and mass, and PM2.5 chemical composition. High-temporal resolution measurements, supported by ancillary meteorological parameters, and source apportionment of PM2.5 using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model, are performed. The integrated approach provides the emissive picture consisting in different anthropogenic sources (i.e. traffic, biomass burning, and industrial facilities) with particular focus on biogas plant emissions. Results showed that CO and nitrogen oxides were influenced by vehicular traffic and biomass combustion, however, a contribution of the plant to NO was observed. SO2 was influenced mainly by transport from the industrial zone, but a second local contribution compatible with the emissions of the biogas plant was detected. Number particle concentrations were analysed in four size ranges: nanoparticles (D < 0.05 μm), ultrafine particles (D < 0.3 μm), accumulation (0.3 < D < 1 μm) and coarse particles (D > 1 μm). Nanoparticles and ultrafine particles were mainly influenced by vehicular traffic and biomass burning, instead, a contribution of the plant was individuated in the accumulation mode. PMF5 identified the contribution of six sources: crustal (14.7% ± 2.1% of measured PM2.5); marine aerosol (aged) (12.9% ± 2.3%); biomass burning (32.8% ± 1.4%); secondary sulphate (19.7% ± 2.4%); primary industrial emissions (5.4% ± 2.3%); traffic and secondary nitrate (17.0% ± 3.9%). The plant is likely to contribute to both sources, the industrial and the traffic plus secondary nitrate.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10278/3724027
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