The major sources of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in New York City (NYC) were apportioned by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to two different sets of particle characteristics: mass concentrations using chemical speciation data and particle number concentrations (PNC) using number size distribution, continuously monitored gases, and PM2.5 data. Post-processing was applied to the PMF results to: (i) match with meteorological data, (ii) use wind data to detect the likely locations of the local sources, and (iii) use concentration weighted trajectory models to assess the strength of potential regional/transboundary sources. Nine sources of PM2.5 mass were apportioned and identified as: secondary ammonium sulfate, secondary ammonium nitrate, road traffic exhaust, crustal dust, fresh sea-salt, aged sea-salt, biomass burning, residual oil/domestic heating and zinc. The sources of PNC were investigated using hourly average number concentrations in six size bins, gaseous air pollutants, mass concentrations of PM2.5, particulate sulfate, OC, and EC. These data were divided into 3 periods indicative of different seasonal conditions. Five sources were resolved for each period: secondary particles, road traffic, NYC background pollution (traffic and oil heating largely in Manhattan), nucleation and O3-rich aerosol. Although traffic does not account for large amounts of PM2.5 mass, it was the main source of particles advected from heavily trafficked zones. The use of residual oil had limited impacts on PM2.5 mass but dominates PNC in cold periods.

Source apportionment of PM 2.5 chemically speciated mass and particle number concentrations in New York City

MASIOL M;
2017

Abstract

The major sources of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in New York City (NYC) were apportioned by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to two different sets of particle characteristics: mass concentrations using chemical speciation data and particle number concentrations (PNC) using number size distribution, continuously monitored gases, and PM2.5 data. Post-processing was applied to the PMF results to: (i) match with meteorological data, (ii) use wind data to detect the likely locations of the local sources, and (iii) use concentration weighted trajectory models to assess the strength of potential regional/transboundary sources. Nine sources of PM2.5 mass were apportioned and identified as: secondary ammonium sulfate, secondary ammonium nitrate, road traffic exhaust, crustal dust, fresh sea-salt, aged sea-salt, biomass burning, residual oil/domestic heating and zinc. The sources of PNC were investigated using hourly average number concentrations in six size bins, gaseous air pollutants, mass concentrations of PM2.5, particulate sulfate, OC, and EC. These data were divided into 3 periods indicative of different seasonal conditions. Five sources were resolved for each period: secondary particles, road traffic, NYC background pollution (traffic and oil heating largely in Manhattan), nucleation and O3-rich aerosol. Although traffic does not account for large amounts of PM2.5 mass, it was the main source of particles advected from heavily trafficked zones. The use of residual oil had limited impacts on PM2.5 mass but dominates PNC in cold periods.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10278/3723793
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