Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) is an approach where a foreign or second language is used as the means of content instruction, for example, to teach Science or History. The challenge students face is to learn already complex subject matter through the linguistic structures and vocabulary of a new L2 which they have only partially mastered. When this double cognitive effort (new content and new language) is suitably directed, it has a positive effect on subject matter acquisition (Smit, 2008; Van de Craen et al., 2007; Várkuti, 2010) and student sense of self-efficacy (Hüttner et al., 2013; Lorenzo et al., 2010). Researchers have also argued that by enhancing learners’ responsibility in the learning process, it enables students in CLIL programmes to make the most of this highly demanding bilingual learning environment. This, in turn, would increase their linguistic and academic achievement (Coyle, 2013; Lasagabaster, 2011; Lasagabaster & Doiz, 2016). Yet, although there has been considerable research on the one hand into learning strategies (LLS) and on the other, into CLIL, the literature linking the two is still very limited. To bridge the gap, this chapter discusses how being able to use cognitive, metacognitive and social learning strategies can make a significant difference in CLIL settings, and presents some findings from a recent longitudinal small-scale study held in two secondary school CLIL classrooms. The chapter concludes with questions for further research.

Integrating learning strategy instruction into Content and Language Integrated Learning programs

MENEGALE MARCELLA
2019-01-01

Abstract

Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) is an approach where a foreign or second language is used as the means of content instruction, for example, to teach Science or History. The challenge students face is to learn already complex subject matter through the linguistic structures and vocabulary of a new L2 which they have only partially mastered. When this double cognitive effort (new content and new language) is suitably directed, it has a positive effect on subject matter acquisition (Smit, 2008; Van de Craen et al., 2007; Várkuti, 2010) and student sense of self-efficacy (Hüttner et al., 2013; Lorenzo et al., 2010). Researchers have also argued that by enhancing learners’ responsibility in the learning process, it enables students in CLIL programmes to make the most of this highly demanding bilingual learning environment. This, in turn, would increase their linguistic and academic achievement (Coyle, 2013; Lasagabaster, 2011; Lasagabaster & Doiz, 2016). Yet, although there has been considerable research on the one hand into learning strategies (LLS) and on the other, into CLIL, the literature linking the two is still very limited. To bridge the gap, this chapter discusses how being able to use cognitive, metacognitive and social learning strategies can make a significant difference in CLIL settings, and presents some findings from a recent longitudinal small-scale study held in two secondary school CLIL classrooms. The chapter concludes with questions for further research.
Learning Strategy Instruction in the Language Classroom: Issues and Implementation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10278/3698777
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