In a very well known verse of the Inferno Virgil defines his poem as a high tragedy, in close proximity to the two occurrences in which Dante refers to his comedy. Going beyond the stylistic opposition, the study endeavours to focus - referring to what the Middle Ages called 'matter' - on the evocation of a particularly memorable name that is accompanying Virgil's definition and, on the other hand, the totally obscure name of Eurypylus and the reasons behind such an association. Based on this episode, and through its connection with other episodes of the "Trojan tragedy" in nearby Cantos - Eurypylus and Calchas, and far more famous characters such as Ulysses, Diomedes and Sinon - the article tries to investigate a possible line of definition for the relationship with the tragic genre within the design of the Commedia.

In a very well known verse of the Inferno Virgil defines his poem as a high tragedy, in close proximity to the two occurrences in which Dante refers to his comedy. Going beyond the stylistic opposition, the study endeavours to focus - referring to what the Middle Ages called 'matter' - on the evocation of a particularly memorable name that is accompanying Virgil's definition and, on the other hand, the totally obscure name of Eurypylus and the reasons behind such an association. Based on this episode, and through its connection with other episodes of the "Trojan tragedy" in nearby Cantos - Eurypylus and Calchas, and far more famous characters such as Ulysses, Diomedes and Sinon - the article tries to investigate a possible line of definition for the relationship with the tragic genre within the design of the Commedia.

"A capture of Troy begins" (Eurypylus, Ulysses, Diomedes, Sinon)

VESCOVO, Pier Mario
2016

Abstract

In a very well known verse of the Inferno Virgil defines his poem as a high tragedy, in close proximity to the two occurrences in which Dante refers to his comedy. Going beyond the stylistic opposition, the study endeavours to focus - referring to what the Middle Ages called 'matter' - on the evocation of a particularly memorable name that is accompanying Virgil's definition and, on the other hand, the totally obscure name of Eurypylus and the reasons behind such an association. Based on this episode, and through its connection with other episodes of the "Trojan tragedy" in nearby Cantos - Eurypylus and Calchas, and far more famous characters such as Ulysses, Diomedes and Sinon - the article tries to investigate a possible line of definition for the relationship with the tragic genre within the design of the Commedia.
68
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
acaptatroya.pdf

non disponibili

Descrizione: Testo pdf
Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Accesso chiuso-personale
Dimensione 306 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
306 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in ARCA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10278/3680693
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact