The paper focuses on the so-called spillover effect in the environmental domain, or the tendency of individuals adopting a specific green behaviour to behave environment-friendly also in other, not related contexts. Different psychological mechanisms explaining this process have been singled out in literature (e.g.: Self Perception Theory, Cognitive Dissonance Theory, etc). However, there is no general agreement neither on the strength nor on the drivers of spillover. The study provides a value added to literature by analyzing the role played by specific factors (so far neglected) in hindering or spurring spillover: monetary and non- monetary rewards. A real-life experiment is carried out on a sample of undergraduate students from Aarhus University (Denmark), based on a panel study with online surveys filled in twice: before and after the experimental intervention. The latter consists of encouraging the uptake of a specific green behaviour (purchase of sustainable products) for a period of 6 weeks, investigating the effects on different behavioural domains and the role played by incentives. Results show how the nature of incentives has a relevant direct impact on the behaviours being incentivized, whereas no significant spillover effect to other behavioural domains is detected.

The Effects of Rewards on Spillover in Environmental Behaviours: Monetary vs Praise Reward

LANZINI, PIETRO
2014

Abstract

The paper focuses on the so-called spillover effect in the environmental domain, or the tendency of individuals adopting a specific green behaviour to behave environment-friendly also in other, not related contexts. Different psychological mechanisms explaining this process have been singled out in literature (e.g.: Self Perception Theory, Cognitive Dissonance Theory, etc). However, there is no general agreement neither on the strength nor on the drivers of spillover. The study provides a value added to literature by analyzing the role played by specific factors (so far neglected) in hindering or spurring spillover: monetary and non- monetary rewards. A real-life experiment is carried out on a sample of undergraduate students from Aarhus University (Denmark), based on a panel study with online surveys filled in twice: before and after the experimental intervention. The latter consists of encouraging the uptake of a specific green behaviour (purchase of sustainable products) for a period of 6 weeks, investigating the effects on different behavioural domains and the role played by incentives. Results show how the nature of incentives has a relevant direct impact on the behaviours being incentivized, whereas no significant spillover effect to other behavioural domains is detected.
Proceedings from The 50th Societas Ethica Annual Conference 2013 Climate Change, Sustainability, and an Ethics of an Open Future
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Linköping 2014.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Capitolo su conference proceedings
Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Accesso gratuito (solo visione)
Dimensione 1.92 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.92 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in ARCA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10278/3641145
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact