The notion of space is among the most stable and basic of human notions, and therefore it attains its greatest concentration in cultural products intended for automatic perception. In this chapter I look at three "topographic spaces" located on the Soviet cultural periphery, which therefore have gone relatively unnoticed in cultural history: postage stamps, a tourism journal, and popular geography. Inasmuch as these items not only reflect "habits of consciousness" but also form part of the "structures of everydayness," they should be seen as culturally significant even though their ideological consequences are less immediately apparent than those of Stalinist art itself. © 2003 by University of Washington Press. All rights reserved.

The art of social navigation: The cultural topography of the Stalin era

Dobrenko E.
2003-01-01

Abstract

The notion of space is among the most stable and basic of human notions, and therefore it attains its greatest concentration in cultural products intended for automatic perception. In this chapter I look at three "topographic spaces" located on the Soviet cultural periphery, which therefore have gone relatively unnoticed in cultural history: postage stamps, a tourism journal, and popular geography. Inasmuch as these items not only reflect "habits of consciousness" but also form part of the "structures of everydayness," they should be seen as culturally significant even though their ideological consequences are less immediately apparent than those of Stalinist art itself. © 2003 by University of Washington Press. All rights reserved.
The Landscape of Stalinism
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10278/3742771
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