Some languages allow the arguments of a verb in a not to be expressed as an overt Pronoun [Lexicon- Section 3.7] or a lexical [Syntax- Chapter 4]. This is the situation in which the term ‘null argument’ is commonly used. Spoken languages vary with respect to whether they allow the arguments of the verbs to be Miller, C. 1994. Simultaneous Constructions in Quebec Sign Language. In: Brennan, M. & G.H. Turner (eds.), Word-Order issues in sign language. Durham: International Sign Linguistic Association, 89-112. tensed clause noun phrase silent.Null arguments are most commonly observed in languages like Italian, Spanish, Catalan and Turkish which have a rich verbal agreement morphology. English, on the other hand, which does not have a rich verbal morphology does not allow arguments of a predicate to be phonologically null in a sentence. In the Turkish and Catalan examples below, the verb bears the person and number agreement marker for the subject which is not phonologically expressed (pro indicates the phonologically null pronoun). a. Kitab-ı bitir-di-m book-ACC finish- PAST-1SG ‘I finished the book.’ b. Al camp pro ho aprofiten tot. in-the countryside it use.3PLeverything ‘In the countryside they use everything.’ (Turkish) (Catalan, Barbera & Quer 2013: ex. (1a)) Languages which identify the referent of the null argument by means of verbal agreement morphology are said to use a licensing strategy based on agreement. Similar to spoken languages, many sign languages also allow one or more of the arguments of the verb in a tensed clause to be phonologically unexpressed. In the ASL question-answer exchange below, the agreeing verb send is marked for subject and object agreement. DID JOHN SEND MARY THE PAPER? YES, ASENDB ‘Yes, (he) sent (it) to (her).’ (ASL, Lillo-Martin 1986: 421) As can be observed, neither the subject nor the object argument of the verb send is pronounced in the response. The null pronouns are nevertheless interpreted as a definite pronominal such as he, her, and it.

Null arguments

Chiara Branchini
2017-01-01

Abstract

Some languages allow the arguments of a verb in a not to be expressed as an overt Pronoun [Lexicon- Section 3.7] or a lexical [Syntax- Chapter 4]. This is the situation in which the term ‘null argument’ is commonly used. Spoken languages vary with respect to whether they allow the arguments of the verbs to be Miller, C. 1994. Simultaneous Constructions in Quebec Sign Language. In: Brennan, M. & G.H. Turner (eds.), Word-Order issues in sign language. Durham: International Sign Linguistic Association, 89-112. tensed clause noun phrase silent.Null arguments are most commonly observed in languages like Italian, Spanish, Catalan and Turkish which have a rich verbal agreement morphology. English, on the other hand, which does not have a rich verbal morphology does not allow arguments of a predicate to be phonologically null in a sentence. In the Turkish and Catalan examples below, the verb bears the person and number agreement marker for the subject which is not phonologically expressed (pro indicates the phonologically null pronoun). a. Kitab-ı bitir-di-m book-ACC finish- PAST-1SG ‘I finished the book.’ b. Al camp pro ho aprofiten tot. in-the countryside it use.3PLeverything ‘In the countryside they use everything.’ (Turkish) (Catalan, Barbera & Quer 2013: ex. (1a)) Languages which identify the referent of the null argument by means of verbal agreement morphology are said to use a licensing strategy based on agreement. Similar to spoken languages, many sign languages also allow one or more of the arguments of the verb in a tensed clause to be phonologically unexpressed. In the ASL question-answer exchange below, the agreeing verb send is marked for subject and object agreement. DID JOHN SEND MARY THE PAPER? YES, ASENDB ‘Yes, (he) sent (it) to (her).’ (ASL, Lillo-Martin 1986: 421) As can be observed, neither the subject nor the object argument of the verb send is pronounced in the response. The null pronouns are nevertheless interpreted as a definite pronominal such as he, her, and it.
SignGram Blueprint. A Guide to Sign Language Grammar Writing
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10278/3694522
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